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  • Alcohol Abuse: The Worrying Facts And Statistics You Need To Know

    Alcohol Abuse Statistics

    Alcoholism is an illness in which a person is compelled to go on drinking in spite of negative consequences up to and including chronic illness or death. There are about 88,000 drinking-related deaths every year in the U.S. Those who die from excessive alcohol use have their lives cut short by an average of 30 years. The economic burden of alcohol abuse was $249 billion in the year 2010.

    Drinking statistics leave no doubt that alcoholism is a deadly illness. Awareness of how damaging alcohol can be to the body and to your health is the key to changing your behavior before it’s too late.

    Alcohol Abuse Statistics

    Statistics regarding the use and abuse of alcohol leave no doubt that alcohol is ruining a lot of lives all over the U.S. and around the world. Here are the numbers in greater detail.

    Social drinking is acceptable in the U.S., and in many settings it’s even expected. Drinking with dinner or at a sporting event for many is considered a well-earned privilege of being an adult. Of course not all who drink an occasional glass of whiskey or take a shot of tequila go on to become physically or psychologically dependent on alcohol. However, there are also many others who do cross the line between social drinking and becoming chemically dependent on alcohol.

    According to the NIAAA, the following is information on alcohol abuse in the U.S.:

    • 86% of people aged 18 years and more reported drinking at least once during their lifetime. 71% of people in the same age group reported that they drank during the past year while 56.9% drank in the past month.
    • 8% of full-time college students aged between 18 and 22 years reported that they consumed alcohol in the past month.
    • 7% of teens aged 15 years reported that they drank at least once during their lifetime.
    • 8% of individuals aged between 12 and 20 years reported drinking in the past month.

    Prevalence Of Binge Drinking

     Infographics on alcohol consumption among adults

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), binge drinking is the most rampant form of excessive alcohol use. Binge drinkers may not drink every day, but they often consume about 8 drinks in one sitting, which is can be very dangerous.

    Drinking a large amount in a short period of time increases the risk of fatal consequences. Consider these binge drinking statistics from 2014:

    • 7% of people aged 18 years and more reported that they binged on alcoholic beverages in the past month.
    • 8% of people aged between 12 and 20 years reported binging on drinks regularly.
    • 9% of college students reported binge drinking in the past month.

    Prevalence Of Heavy Drinking

    The statistics on heavy drinking provide clues to how troubling facts about alcohol abuse really are. The following are the disconcerting facts, as obtained from surveys carried out in 2014:

    • 7% of people aged 18 years and more reported that they binged on alcoholic beverages in the past month.
    • 8% of people aged between 12 and 20 years reported binging on drinks regularly.
    • 9% of college students reported binge drinking in the past month.

    Prevalence Of Heavy Drinking

    The statistics on heavy drinking provide clues to how troubling facts about alcohol abuse really are. The following are the disconcerting facts, as obtained from surveys carried out in 2014:

    • 7% of people aged 18 years and older reported drinking heavily at least once in the past month.
    • 4% of individuals aged between 12 and 20 years are heavy drinkers.
    • 2% of college students reported engaging in heavy drinking in the past month.

    Prevalence Of AUD

    When problem drinking starts to spiral out of control, it is known as an Alcohol Use Disorder, which can lead to addiction if not treated early. A person with this condition will feel a strong urge to drink alcohol or to keep drinking once they start.

    How Common Is An Alcohol Use Disorder?

    According to U.S. government records for 2014, 8% of people aged 18 years and older suffer from an Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD), and more commonly men than women. 7% of people aged between 12 and 17 years suffer from AUD.

    Alcohol Use Disorder indicates that the person is dependent on drinking and feels compelled to turn to alcohol compulsively.

    AUD can progress to addiction if it is not treated promptly. According to U.S. government records for 2014, AUD is prevalent among both youths and adults:

    • 8% of people aged 18 years and older (16.3 million adults) suffered from AUD. The prevalence is greater among men than women, for in this group were 10.6 million men and 5.7 million women.
    • 7% of people aged between 12 and 17 years (679,000 adolescents) suffered from AUD. Females outnumbered males in this group. There were 367,000 females compared to 311,000 males.
    Some more facts about alcoholism:
    • 1 in 10 pregnant women drinks, according to the CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) report for 2011-2013.
    • 1 in 33 women binged on drinks during the past month during the period from 2011 to 2013.
    • During 2011-2013, pregnant women reported an average of 4.6 binge-drinking episodes during the past month compared to an average of 3.1 reported by women who are not pregnant.
    • The prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is 0.3 per 1,000 children aged between 7 and 9 years, according to the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report published by CDC on January 30, 2015. FAS is marked by stunted growth and abnormal functioning of the central nervous system of the fetus resulting from maternal alcohol abuse.

    What Are The Dangers Of Alcoholism?

    According to alcohol poisoning statistics, in the U.S. six people die every day from alcohol poisoning. This occurs when a person drinks a large amount of alcohol during a very short period of time (also known as binge drinking). Symptoms include shallow breathing, low heart rate, and low body temperature, and this may ultimately be fatal.

    One of the main causes of traffic accidents is driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI). Drinking can lower reaction time and coordination as well as slowing cognitive processes. A driver who is intoxicated cannot see or hear well and may feel sleepy and tired. Only one or two drinks can be enough to impair driving ability and endanger the lives of innocent people.

    Drinking-Related Deaths

    Long term abuse of alcohol can lead to many health problems and ultimately death. Some health problems caused by alcohol abuse include:

    • Stroke
    • Liver disease and liver failure
    • Cancer
    • Suicide
    • Driving accidents
    • Poisoning
    Infographics on alcohol poisoning deaths among men and women

    How Common Are Drinking-Related Deaths?

    Deaths caused by alcohol are most common among middle-aged adults, aging 35-64 years old. 76% of those affected are men and 24% are women. About 88,000 people die every year in the U.S. from drinking-related causes.

    Alcohol abuse damages almost all the organs of the body and causes various medical complications and diseases. If it continues and the diseases are not treated, the consequences can be fatal.

    Besides these physiological side effects, this addiction also impairs brain function. People are known to cause accidents or get involved in violence under the influence of alcohol.

    The following numbers prove that alcohol can be deadly:

    • Alcohol abuse is the fourth leading cause of mortality in the country.
    • An average of 6 people die every day from alcohol poisoning, according to a 2015 report by the CDC
    • 76% of alcohol poisoning or overdose deaths are amongst working-age people between 35 and 64 years.
    • 76% of alcohol overdose deaths are amongst men.
    • In 2014, 31% of all driving-related fatalities were caused by people who were driving under the influence of alcohol.
    • About 1,825 college students aged between 18 and 24 years die every year from drinking-related causes.
    • In 2011, 48% of all people who died of cirrhosis abused alcohol.
    • In 2011, drinking-related cirrhosis deaths were highest (72.7%) amongst people aged between 25 and 35 years, followed by those between 35 and 44 years of age (70.3%).
    • More than 3,000 people have died during 2006-2010 from cardiac diseases and strokes caused by excessive alcohol use, according to the Alcohol-Related Disease Impact Report by CDC.
    If you have any questions concerning the rehab process or your individual journey to recovery, please call (888)-459-5511 to speak with one of our treatment support advisors who will answer your questions confidentially — at any time of the day or night — with no obligation.

    Drinking-Related Diseases, Accidents, And Violence Statistics

    Infographics on alcohol-related violent incidents

    Abusing alcohol can cause damage to both the body and the mind. When a person drinks habitually, they lose control over their impulses, cognitive faculties, and reflexes. The result is an increase in the number of violent incidents.

    • Every year 696,000 college students aged between 18 and 24 years are involved in drinking-related assaults.
    • Every year 97,000 college students aged between 18 and 24 years report experiencing drinking-related sexual assault or date rape.
    • A 3% decrease in the number of bars in Buckhead, Atlanta, between 1997-2002 and 2003-2007 led to a 2-fold greater decrease in the number of violent crimes in this neighborhood compared to other areas in the city.

    Economic And Social Costs Of Alcohol Abuse

    The social and economic burden of abusing adult beverages ranges from loss of productive capacity to being unable to have a happy or stable family life.

    The following are some heartbreaking statistics:

    • The number of years of potential life lost (YPLL) was 2.5 million during the period from 2006 to 2010, according to CDC.
    • $249 billion was the cost of drinks abuse in the U.S. in 2010. Excessive alcohol use is a drain on the economy of the country.
    • About 1 in 4 college students report instances of absenteeism and falling grades caused by alcohol use.
    • More than 10% of all U.S. children live with a parent who abuses alcohol. It is likely that these children grow up witnessing verbal, physical, and/or emotional abuse or worse, experience it themselves. They may also suffer from physical and/or emotional neglect and indifference and are scarred for life.
    Alcoholism statistics are proof that continuing to drink to excess can lead to irreversible consequences. These statistics reinforce the need for spreading awareness both amongst those who use alcohol and those who live with people who do.

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